The Tern Cargo Node is the folding cargo bike you’ve been dreaming of

If you live in the big city, it’s likely you that either don’t own a car, or you’ve looked at the one you do own and wondered just how badly you need it. Going car-free could alleviate a significant financial burden, but doing so is not exactly straightforward.

Proximity to shops is always an issue, and if you regularly need to carry large or heavy objects (think weekly shop, disposing of recycling, that sort of thing), giving up your vehicle is likely to be a non-starter.

In theory, a cargo bike might well the solution to your problems, but in practice, it’s not quite that simple. Current models on the market all suffer the same essential drawback – they’re too damned big. For all but the ultra-wealthy, urban living means an apartment, usually one that’s not on the ground floor, and often one with nowhere to store a gigantic bicycle.

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Related: Tern Verge X10 review

The Cargo Node from Tern was recently the subject of a successful Kickstarter campaign in collaboration with cargo bike company Xtracycle. We’ve now laid hands on the bike at a press conference in Taiwan, and it looks like it might be the answer.

Unlike Tern’s other bikes, its primary purpose is not to be taken on the train or stuck under the table in a café. Rather, it folds down so you can fit it in elevators or cars, and store it in a closet at home when you’re not using it. Where a conventional cargo bike might occupy your entire hallway, this one will be out of sight and out of mind.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

The Tern Cargo Node: the folding cargo bike you’ve been dreaming of

If you live in the big city, it’s likely you that either don’t own a car, or you’ve looked at the one you do own and wondered just how badly you need it. Going car-free could alleviate a significant financial burden, but doing so is not exactly straightforward.

Proximity to shops is always an issue, and if you regularly need to carry large or heavy objects (think weekly shop, disposing of recycling, that sort of thing), giving up your vehicle is likely to be a non-starter.

In theory, a cargo bike might well the solution to your problems, but in practice, it’s not quite that simple. Current models on the market all suffer the same essential drawback – they’re too damned big. For all but the ultra-wealthy, urban living means an apartment, usually one that’s not on the ground floor, and often one with nowhere to store a gigantic bicycle.

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

Related: Tern Verge X10 review

The Cargo Node from Tern was recently the subject of a successful Kickstarter campaign in collaboration with cargo bike company Xtracycle. We’ve now laid hands on the bike at a press conference in Taiwan, and it looks like it might be the answer.

Unlike Tern’s other bikes, its primary purpose is not to be taken on the train or stuck under the table in a café. Rather, it folds down so you can fit it in elevators or cars, and store it in a closet at home when you’re not using it. Where a conventional cargo bike might occupy your entire hallway, this one will be out of sight and out of mind.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

AngryAsian: Embrace winter on your bike

Much of the western world marked the end of Daylight Saving Time this past weekend, rolling the clocks back an hour and helping our days start off on a brighter note. Unfortunately, the correspondingly earlier sunset also usually means the end of midweek rides – but it doesn’t have to be that way.

The sun may be setting earlier and the air may be getting colder but that doesn’t mean you’re relegated to only riding indoors or on weekends. Winter isn’t a season to be fought tooth and nail; it’s another season just like summer, spring, and autumn, and there’s no reason it can’t be as enjoyable with the right approach.

Bring your own sun

Dealing with the darkness is the easiest of the problems to fix: get some lights! Granted, riding at night isn’t always the smartest or safest thing to do on heavily trafficked roads but you might be surprised just how much fun it can be on dirt.

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Twenty years ago, my work and class schedule meant I did the vast majority of my trail riding in darkness. As did many of my riding buddies at the time, I used a then state-of-the-art single Niterider 15-watt halogen lamp to light the way. The output was laughably feeble by modern standards, the beam pattern sucked, the bulbs would occasionally blow out, and the 90-minute run time prompted me to carry two battery packs.

Modern LED lights are incredibly good and often quite reasonably priced. Don’t get sucked into top-end models when a lesser one will suit your needs just fine

Bundle up

Go fat

Keep it fun

Gear up for your best winter ever

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Exclusive: Behind the scenes of Philips’ stunning Darklight film

Philips recently released Darklight, a seven-minute movie promoting its latest ambient lighting TV, and it’s a clip that stands as a benchmark mountain bike flick in its own right. If you’ve not yet seen it then it’s time you caught up.

Related: Philips’ Darklight mountain bike movie looks simply stunning

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Now, we’d have never have assumed that putting together seven minutes of unique, LED-lit mountain bike footage would be an easy task, but it wasn’t until we were shown this behind-the-scenes footage that we understood what the 30-person film crew had to deal with.

Throughout filming, the crew behind Darklight had to lug about six tons of equipment in and out of two near-inaccessible areas. Now, factor in the sleep deprivation that 38 nights of filming brings, and the moment when one of Specialized’s athletes was bitten by a rattlesnake, and you’ll start to get the picture. Enjoy.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Delays reported on Eurostar cycle carriage policy

A few days have now passed since Eurostar’s new bike carriage policy came into effect, but UK cycling charity CTC thinks it may not be active just yet.

The new policy, which was due to come into effect on Sunday 1 November, rules that cyclists must now box up their bikes to travel on the Eurostar train service. But CTC says an employee has since travelled to Paris and back without the need to dismantle and box up his cycle – and was told it would probably be the end of November before the new scheme is fully implemented.

Related: How to pack your bike for a trip abroad

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BikeRadar contacted Eurostar to ask if these delays are true, and was told that the new cycle carriage policy is now operational for all customers. Not so, says CTC’s Road Safety and Legal Campaigns Officer, Duncan Dollimore.

“I spoke to the guy at the [dispatch] counter who confirmed they had not boxed any bikes on the day the new policy was supposed to start,” says Dollimore. “He then said it would probably be the end of the month before they started boxing cycles.”

The rule change has drawn criticism from leading politicians on both sides of the Channel, including the UK’s All Party Parliamentary Cycling Group, the Mayor of London, Boris Johnson MP, and the Mayor of Paris, Anne Hidalgo.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Cafe du Cycliste Women’s Heidi jacket

A good winter riding jacket turns a fear of cold weather rides into a desire to get outside and go exploring. In the past, a lot of designs for women have been hit and miss. A scaled down unisex product is typically too loose in the sleeves and short or billowy at the front.

As we described in our first look at the Café du Cycliste range, this is one of many products available in a men’s and women’s design. The Women’s Heidi jacket not only fits ladies well when riding, but it holds its snug shape when opening the carefully placed zips for temperature regulation. Its classy appearance might have you reaching for it off the bike too.

A quilted looking material lines the front to block the wind from your chest and shoulders. This has been used cleverly in the sleeves too, sewn inside the panel that cops the wind. Soft fleece remains close to the skin on the inside section of your arm.

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Soft and fleecy

The breathable, moisture-wicking main fabric is woollen in appearance but it’s quick to dry and fleecy on the inside. After heavy use during the Australian winter it has begun to pill a bit on the inside of the arms, but the grey marle colouring means you have to look closely to see the effects of a high level of use.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Vote for your fave autumn riding photo

Last week we asked you to post your best autumn riding photos on the BikeRadar forum, and were quickly blown away…

So many amazing photos came in, from all over the world. There were arty shots of Swiss transmitter towers, autumn sunrises in San Diego, gritty UK rides in hard rain, snowy shots above the tree line on Col du Galibier and loads more.

It’s now time to pick a winner, and we need your help. Please head over to the voting page and select your favourite photo – voting closes this Friday (November 6th) so head over there now and pick your choice. Go on, it’s quick and easy, take a look!

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VOTE HERE

Related: Four short but effective autumn cycling workouts

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Zen Bicycle Company ROAD frameset

Portland, Oregon-based builder Zen Bicycle Company proves that steel doesn’t have to be synonymous with ‘old’ or ‘slow’. The company’s simply named ROAD frame pairs a thoroughly modern Columbus HSS Spirit oversized niobium steel tubeset with an Enve carbon fork, Zen’s own convertible dropout design, and disc brakes at either end for a quintessentially springy and lively ride that’ll quickly help you forget about those extra grams.

Feedback and personality galore

If you love the magic carpet feel of many carbon road frames, you can stop reading now because the Zen ROAD most definitely is not the droid you’re looking for. Instead, the oversized, thin-walled tubing is highly communicative of what’s going on down below, faithfully transmitting road texture and bumps as if reading braille.

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The Columbus Spirit HSS tubing imparts a wonderfully communicative ride quality

That’s not to say that the ROAD is harsh, and in fact, it’s anything but (in most situations). The blacktop might very well be constantly speaking to you but it’s more like a helpful narrative, not someone screaming obscenities. There’s heaps of springiness, ‘snap’, and ‘pop’ to the ride quality, and the oversized pipes are admirably responsive under power.

However, that directness can be a bit much at times, particularly on dirt roads with lots of washboard or on especially poor pavement where I would have appreciated a more muted ride. Keep in mind that this is all with ultra-supple (but relatively narrow) 24mm-wide Specialized Turbo tubeless clinchers installed on Enve carbon rims and although it’s a rather tight fit, Zen officially says there’s room at either end for 28s. Going with that higher-volume size certainly goes a long way toward smoothing out small imperfections but it does add a bit of rotating weight.

Old-school steel but modern alloys with contemporary shapes and features

Verdict: A great choice if you’re looking for something a little different

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

This electric bike folds in just one second

It sounds too good to be true – an electric, smart, maintenance-free bike made for commuting that folds up in just one second. Where’s the catch? Well the Gi FlyBike is currently seeking funding on Kickstarter, but the team behind it already smashed their original $75,000 goal in a matter of hours.

The Gi FlyBike will be made from lightweight alloy and features something called ‘Electric Flight Assistance’, which means users can ride 40 miles (60 km) on a single LifePo4 battery charge. Solid tyres mean no more punctures, while a belt drive dispenses with grease, noise and trouser clips.

There is – of course – a companion app that controls the built-in LED lights and smart locking system. The Gi FlyBike also has a smartphone cradle so you can have navigation in front of you when you’re riding.

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Related: Do e-bikes belong on singletrack?

But it’s that folding system that’s got us swooning. While many other commuting bikes need a practised hand to fold them up sideways, the Gi FlyBike simply folds up vertically – a hinge on the down tube means the 26in wheels come together quickly and easily.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar