Speedplay looks to win over doubters with Zero Aero pedals and Walkable Cleats

Over the past year or so, Speedplay has adapted its lovable lollipop pedals for everything from the aero enthusiast to those with a hunger for all things gravel.

While Speedplay’s faithful user base swears by the pedals, its cleats have been a bit of a mixed bag. The adjustability is second to none, but their price, lack of traction and questionable durability make them a true hassle.

Released together, the Aero Walkable Cleats and Zero Aero pedals offer an interesting solution to our cleat-based woes.

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Related: Speedplay Zero Pave pedals review

Aero Pedal – £230 / $275 / AU$399 (including cleats)

Speedplay’s new Zero Aero trades dual sided entry for aerodynamics, but is it worth it?

Aero Walkable Cleat – £60 / $55 / AU$90

Speedplay Torque Wrench – £16 / $18 / AU$30

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Sir Chris Hoy pens Flying Fergus kids' books

Former track cyclist Sir Chris Hoy has taken the wraps off his new children’s books, part of the Flying Fergus series.

The first two titles in the series will The Best Birthday Bike and The Great Cycle Challenge, to be released in late February 2016. They were written alongside award-winning author Joanna Nadin, and focus on the exploits of Fergus, an ordinary nine-year-old boy with an extraordinary imagination.

Related: Chris Hoy’s hand-built Shand keirin bike revealed

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Any old iron

The first instalment introduces our hero Fergus, who wants a top-of-the-range “Sullivan Swift” bike for his birthday. But money’s been tight since his dad disappeared years before, and his mum and granddad have struggled to make ends meet.

So instead, Fergus inherits his dad’s old rusty bike – but when he heads out to test it at the park with his best friend Daisy and his faithful dog Chimp, he discovers there might be more to the old bike than meets the eye…

Freedom and adventure

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Giro Empire VR90 shoes

With a lightweight but durable upper, a stiff carbon sole clad in soft Vibram rubber, and a lace-up closure, the Giro Empire VR90 shoes are a great option for cross-country riding, and good for fair-weather cyclocross. More aggressive trail riders might find the shoes lacking in protection on the sides of the feet, but the uppers have shown resilience from standard wear and tear.

Following on the success of its road lace-up Empires, Giro starting riffing on the design for MTB shoes in late 2013. A limited edition Empire VR90 followed last year, with this production show available now.

Four BikeRadar testers have worn the shoes for months, in everything from casual off-road riding to eight-hour cross-country races to trail riding to cyclocross. Our consensus is that they are fairly stiff but quite comfortable on the bike. For those doing lots of hike-a-bike, you’ll probably prefer something with a more flexible sole. But for short scrambles the Empire VR90s work great, with the almost-gummy Vibram outsoles gripping well on rock and the light weight almost disappearing from your feet.

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The Empire VR90s hold up well to rough treatment and cleaning. We were pleasantly surprised to note that we never felt the need to adjust the laces during rides or races – a good thing, because it ain’t easy

My test pair of 45.5 shoes weighed 700g. I normally wear 45, but like most testers I had to go up a half size because the VR90s fit snugly through the forefoot. While many other Giro shoes come in wide options, the VR90s do not.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Watch Claudio Caluori’s greatest hits from 2015

The ultimate Claudio megamix

Claudio Caluori of Switzerland poses for a photograph during the first stage of the Ice Cross Downhill World Championship at the Red Bull Crashed Ice in Quebec City, Canada on November 26, 2015. // Joerg Mitter / Red Bull Content Pool // P-20151128-00304 // Usage for editorial use only // Please go to www.redbullcontentpool.com for further information. //
Claudio Caluori of Switzerland poses for a photograph during the first stage of the Ice Cross Downhill World Championship at the Red Bull Crashed Ice in Quebec City, Canada on November 26, 2015. // Joerg Mitter / Red Bull Content Pool // P-20151128-00304 // Usage for editorial use only // Please go to www.redbullcontentpool.com for further information. //

We have to say that Claudio Caluori has really stepped up his efforts with the helmet cam previews this year. …Continue reading »
Source: MBR

BikeRadar gear of the year: Aoife Glass's 2015 picks

It’s been a bumper year for women’s cycling in 2015, with new pro teams, increasing financial support, more media coverage and, of course, more and more gear designed for women at all levels of road cycling and mountain biking. 

I joined BikeRadar in the spring, shifting over from my previous role as deputy editor of Total Women’s Cycling. It’s been rewarding and fascinating to track  how women’s cycling has evolved over the year and continues to change.

It’s becoming clear that bike brands, clothing companies and equipment manufacturers are sitting up and taking notice of the ever-increasing number of women riding, and the fact that we’re a diverse bunch, riding at all levels, all disciplines, all ages and all around the world. 

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Highlights for me have included watching the cream of the female pro peloton lay it all on the line for La Course in Paris, and getting to shred the revamped Juliana Roubion on the old mining trails of California. It’s been exciting to hear how brands like Bell Helmets are putting their money where their mouths are and investing in quality research to ensure they’re getting it right for women, with many more brands investing in marketing, research and product development. 

There’s also never been more choice when it comes to women’s bikes, clothing and gear – though I feel there’s room for even more. 

So after thinking long and hard, I’ve selected the products that have stood out for me over the past year. These are the items I reach for again and again, the ones I bore my friends talking at length about, and the ones I’d recommend. 

Juliana Roubion 2 CC XX1 2016

Five Ten Freerider Wmns

Giro Women’s Undershort

Lululemon Ta Ta Tamer sports bra

Rapha Women’s Long Sleeve Brevet Jersey

Polaris Mica jersey

Flare Roost DH Shorts

Hope F20 flat pedals

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

RockShox' Yari fork is a lot like a budget Lyrik

When you’re trying to cut corners on a bike build, cheaping out on the suspension is never a good idea. But affordable doesn’t always mean inferior – and that’s what RockShox is hoping to demonstrate with its new Yari suspension fork.

Unveiled earlier this summer, the Yari can be thought of as a Lyrik for riders on a tight budget. It’s available now and retails for $700 / £560 / AUS $1,190. While it’s not exactly cheap, it becomes more palatable when compared with the Lyrik, which goes for $1,030 / £824 / AUS $1,776.

Related: RockShox Lyrik RCT3 Solo Air

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More importantly, the Yari fills a hole in RockShox’ OE line. It will come stock on a wide range of more affordable trail and enduro models in 2016. Until now RockShox lacked an affordable fork with 35mm stanchions. This should be a plus for many riders – allowing them to get nearly the performance of a Lyrik or a Pike on a much more affordable mountain bike. 

So how similar is the Yari to the Lyrik? Very.

In fact, its magnesium crown and lowers are identical to the Lyrik.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Boost your bunnyhops: explosive movements take you higher

You may have seen our original bunnyhop video, which featured a couple of ways of working it. Now Matt Legg-Bagg from Bristol’s Pedal Progression runs through how to get those hops higher.

Related: How to bunnyhop

The bunnyhop movement is an explosive one – the more you put in, the more you’ll get out. Big movements with your feet & heels, to drive the bike into the air, are what you want.

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How high you get your front wheel makes all the difference… concentrate on a good pumped manual to get high. You need big compression with dropped heels – push with your legs to get the front wheel up up. This dictates the bunnyhop, because if the front doesn’t get up enough, the rear wheel won’t follow

A big bunnyhop will take you out of your comfort zone. Find an obstacle you want to get over, and replicate its height with a piece string to practise, so that if you mess up it’s essentially risk-free. Wait till you’re nailing it every time, then take it to the real obstacle.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar