Dropbyke is shaking up the city bike hire model

Move aside Santander Cycles, make way Citi Bike NYC, there’s a new way to rent a bike in town. Introducing Dropbyke, a mobile app-based system that allows you to pick up and drop off a bike wherever you fancy, without the eternal search for a docking station with space. 

Cycling is the perfect way to get around a city. It’s quick, clean, safe, doesn’t require fuel, is inexpensive and accessible. In fact, the only barrier is actually owning a bike. Urban cycle hire schemes were introduced to alleviate this need, allowing everyone from tourists to commuters an easier way about town. However, there are some problems with these schemes, and the creators of Dropbyke think their concept provides an alternative solution. 

What is Dropbyke?

The concept is a familiar one: a fleet of hire bikes available for general use across the city.

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

Where Dropbyke differs from the large-scale cycle hire schemes in cities like Paris, London and New York is that it doesn’t require the extensive infrastructure of docking stations, pay points and transportation of bikes between them.

Related: Urban routefinder BeeLine will add navigation to your bike for peanuts

Instead, users sign up online, and download an iOS or Android app that tells them which fleet bikes are nearby, where they’re located and and a rental rate. If they select a bike, it gives them the access code for the lock it’s secured with. Once the user is finished with the bike, they lock it up outside, take a picture of the bike for the next user, log its location on the app, add any notes about it and rate the experience.

Where did the idea come from?

Dropbyke in action

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

AngryAsian: Why the T47 bottom bracket isn’t going to oust press-fit

Much has been written about the new T47 threaded bottom bracket ‘standard’ in recent weeks and a lot of people are rightfully excited about it. In one fell swoop, T47 – at least in theory – provides the ease of service and quiet creak-free running of traditional English threaded shells but with the oversized dimensions and enormous drivetrain compatibility that frame designers desire.

So T47 sounds like the solution we’ve all been waiting for, doesn’t it? Yay! Crack open the champagne! Start singing Kum Ba Yah!

Sorry to be the killjoy, but I wouldn’t go celebrating just yet.

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

Technical pros and cons aside, I’m highly skeptical that T47 will expand into the mainstream where the most people stand to benefit. Here’s why.

The new T47 threaded bottom bracket design (at left) holds enormous promise over press-fit systems but its widespread acceptance is anything but certain

Why press-fit came about in the first place

No, apparently we can’t all get along

Late to the party

Light at the end of the tunnel?

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Speedplay looks to win over doubters with Zero Aero pedals and Walkable Cleats

Over the past year or so, Speedplay has adapted its lovable lollipop pedals for everything from the aero enthusiast to those with a hunger for all things gravel.

While Speedplay’s faithful user base swears by the pedals, its cleats have been a bit of a mixed bag. The adjustability is second to none, but their price, lack of traction and questionable durability make them a true hassle.

Released together, the Aero Walkable Cleats and Zero Aero pedals offer an interesting solution to our cleat-based woes.

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

Related: Speedplay Zero Pave pedals review

Aero Pedal – £230 / $275 / AU$399 (including cleats)

Speedplay’s new Zero Aero trades dual sided entry for aerodynamics, but is it worth it?

Aero Walkable Cleat – £60 / $55 / AU$90

Speedplay Torque Wrench – £16 / $18 / AU$30

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Sir Chris Hoy pens Flying Fergus kids' books

Former track cyclist Sir Chris Hoy has taken the wraps off his new children’s books, part of the Flying Fergus series.

The first two titles in the series will The Best Birthday Bike and The Great Cycle Challenge, to be released in late February 2016. They were written alongside award-winning author Joanna Nadin, and focus on the exploits of Fergus, an ordinary nine-year-old boy with an extraordinary imagination.

Related: Chris Hoy’s hand-built Shand keirin bike revealed

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

Any old iron

The first instalment introduces our hero Fergus, who wants a top-of-the-range “Sullivan Swift” bike for his birthday. But money’s been tight since his dad disappeared years before, and his mum and granddad have struggled to make ends meet.

So instead, Fergus inherits his dad’s old rusty bike – but when he heads out to test it at the park with his best friend Daisy and his faithful dog Chimp, he discovers there might be more to the old bike than meets the eye…

Freedom and adventure

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Giro Empire VR90 shoes

With a lightweight but durable upper, a stiff carbon sole clad in soft Vibram rubber, and a lace-up closure, the Giro Empire VR90 shoes are a great option for cross-country riding, and good for fair-weather cyclocross. More aggressive trail riders might find the shoes lacking in protection on the sides of the feet, but the uppers have shown resilience from standard wear and tear.

Following on the success of its road lace-up Empires, Giro starting riffing on the design for MTB shoes in late 2013. A limited edition Empire VR90 followed last year, with this production show available now.

Four BikeRadar testers have worn the shoes for months, in everything from casual off-road riding to eight-hour cross-country races to trail riding to cyclocross. Our consensus is that they are fairly stiff but quite comfortable on the bike. For those doing lots of hike-a-bike, you’ll probably prefer something with a more flexible sole. But for short scrambles the Empire VR90s work great, with the almost-gummy Vibram outsoles gripping well on rock and the light weight almost disappearing from your feet.

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

The Empire VR90s hold up well to rough treatment and cleaning. We were pleasantly surprised to note that we never felt the need to adjust the laces during rides or races – a good thing, because it ain’t easy

My test pair of 45.5 shoes weighed 700g. I normally wear 45, but like most testers I had to go up a half size because the VR90s fit snugly through the forefoot. While many other Giro shoes come in wide options, the VR90s do not.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Watch Claudio Caluori’s greatest hits from 2015

The ultimate Claudio megamix

Claudio Caluori of Switzerland poses for a photograph during the first stage of the Ice Cross Downhill World Championship at the Red Bull Crashed Ice in Quebec City, Canada on November 26, 2015. // Joerg Mitter / Red Bull Content Pool // P-20151128-00304 // Usage for editorial use only // Please go to www.redbullcontentpool.com for further information. //
Claudio Caluori of Switzerland poses for a photograph during the first stage of the Ice Cross Downhill World Championship at the Red Bull Crashed Ice in Quebec City, Canada on November 26, 2015. // Joerg Mitter / Red Bull Content Pool // P-20151128-00304 // Usage for editorial use only // Please go to www.redbullcontentpool.com for further information. //

We have to say that Claudio Caluori has really stepped up his efforts with the helmet cam previews this year. …Continue reading »
Source: MBR