MBUK Issue 323 – in the shops now!

Issue 323 of MBUK is out now and is jam-packed with awesome features, amazing rides and tons of kit reviews. There’s a new three-part series documenting the evolution of a classic – this issue looks at the Lapierre Zesty with words from Lapierre engineer Herve Layes and top racer Nico Vouilloz. Alongside the feature is a competition giving you the chance to win a brand new 2016 Lapierre Zesty AM 527 worth £3,200! Enter the competition here and read a first ride review of the bike here.

What are you waiting for? Go via the shop on the way home and get one!

Alternatively click here to subscribe and never have to worry about missing an issue again! A subscription makes a great Christmas gift too…….

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You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

This invention promises to stop car doors taking out cyclists

You know the scenario. Cycling down the road, minding your own business, when suddenly ‘WHAM’ – someone opens a car door in your path and you go flying. At best it’s painful and a little embarrassing, at worst it could lead to a fate you don’t really want to think about. But one company in Melbourne, Australia reckons it’s come up with a solution. 

The company, Dooring Alert Systems – named for the common term used to describe the above scenario – has developed a patent-pending warning system that alerts car drivers and passengers as well as passing cyclists and pedestrians to the imminent opening of a vehicle door. It believes its product will “save lives, [and reduce] injuries and the post trauma reactions to all involved, directly and indirectly.”

So how does it work? There are two products planned, based around a similar system, triggered by the unbuckling of a seatbelt. This starts a ‘lighting sequence’ in the lights placed around the rear window and side mirrors. 

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The first product would be a version of the above system that can be retro-fitted to vehicles. 

Dooring Alert Systems (or DAS) has also developed a second, integrated system that does all the above, plus lights up the interior of the car as a reminder to its occupants to check for cyclists, and includes cameras to monitor oncoming traffic. 

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Cotic's 650b Rocket is ready to blast the trails

Cotic – based, appropriately, in the Steel City of Sheffield – has been building a small but diverse range of largely steel bikes for more than a decade. Along the way it’s also built a cult following of fans, drawn to its simple yet effective road and mountain bikes.

The Rocket was Cotic’s second full-suspension bike (after its Hemlock debut), with a steel front mated to an alloy rear. The original Rocket was launched, unfortunately, just before 26in wheels died a death and 650b / 27.5+ became the ‘next big thing’ – and as such the production run was limited and the bike disappeared from sale.

Related: Cotic Solaris 27.5+ rolling chassis

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That frustrating experience made Cotic’s team all the more excited to show us the new Rocket, which is on sale now, ready and waiting to take 27.5in rolling stock.

With bigger wheels plugged in, the rear end inevitably lengthened, so to keep the weight balance the same as the original, the front end was also stretched out a touch. Instead of designing the bike around an average length fork, the new model was based around the longest that could be fitted (it’s compatible with both 150mm and 160mm of travel).

Stern stuff

Cotic’s linkage-driven single-pivot design ‘Droplink’ suspension system remains, tuned to give a progressive, poppy ride. Despite some riders feeling that single-pivot setups, even linkage-driven ones, don’t have the same qualities of more complicated suspension systems, Cotic says that axle path and compression rates are very similar to big-hitters such as the Santa Cruz Nomad.

All mod cons

Stable at speed

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

6 ways for mountain bikers to relieve the pain of winter training

When the nights draw in, the rain falls hard and the temperatures plummet, getting those winter miles in on the mountain bike can be the furthest thing from your mind – especially when life is super busy.

Lay the groundwork now though and you’ll reap the rewards later. To help you out, BikeRadar spoke to pro athletes and fitness professionals to get the lowdown on how to maximise training when you don’t have the time (or motivation!) to spend long hours out on the bike. 

“It’s hard for me to comment on how to survive British winter training,” says pro endurance mountain biker Sally Bigham, helpfully. “I go away every winter to train in warmer climates.” Unfortunately that’s just not a reality for most of us, and while some might be happy to let their fitness slide during the winter months, for many committed amateurs winter is the time when next year’s goals come into focus and the foundation stones for specific improvements need to be laid down. 

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But the ideal of winter base miles – long and slow and often on the road – to build up the ‘base of the fitness pyramid’ is hard to achieve when weather, daylight and family commitments interfere. And that’s not even taking into account the lure of the pub lunch/open fire/red wine combo.

So having picked the brains of Bigham, Ironman world champion Chrissie Wellington and experienced sports physio Charlie McCall, we bring you the BikeRadar expert guide to winter training survival:

1. Quality is key

2. Cheat with weight lifting

3. Race yourself fit

4. Eat well

5.     Rest and recover

6.     Enjoy it!

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Trek's Farley 9.8 is like whipped chocolate – big and fat but still light and fluffy

Trek’s Farley range of fat bikes has always taken a different tack with slightly smaller-than-typical tyres that work reasonably well on snow but are more versatile everywhere else. The new upper-end carbon fibre Farley models take that philosophy even further with larger-diameter 27.5×3.8in tyres that supposedly offer the same benefits that bigger wheels do for trail bikes – but still with plenty of clearance for the fattest 26in wheels and tyres when the snow starts to fall.

Building a frame to handle both of those wheel and formats is relatively easy in one sense, since the overall diameters are so similar. However, accommodating that massive 5in width required a bit of ingenuity. 

Aluminum Farleys use 177mm-wide rear dropout spacing and a 100mm-wide threaded bottom bracket – both dimensions being on the narrower end of things as far as fat bikes are concerned – and just barely accommodate 26x4in tyres. The new carbon Farleys, however, can gobble up tyres as wide as 26x5in but still maintain the same pedal stance width and chainstay length.

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It took some doing to build the carbon Farley to accept the biggest 26in tyres on the market but without increasing pedal stance width or chainstay length

As expected, rear hub spacing on the new carbon bikes move to the wider 197mm thru-axle format – essentially the standard for fat bikes running such wide tyres. Instead of widening the bottom bracket shell by 20mm to compensate, though, Trek has moved to a 122mm press-fit format that keeps the bearings and cranks in the same positions as before but still allows the impossibly thin chainstays (just 13mm thick each!) to be pushed further apart for more clearance. To maintain a proper chainline, the direct-mount chainring is flipped from its usual orientation so that it’s offset to the outside.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

2016 Adventure Cross dates released

The MBR-Cycling Weekly Adventure cross series is back for 2016! Now in its 3rd year the adventure cross series consists of 5 events located in North Yorkshire, Cumbria, Derbyshire and Scotland, taking in the some of the best on and off road cycling the UK has to offer:

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Save upto 25% on your rides for 2016 – Adventure Cross dates released
Source: MBR