It's time to cast your votes for British Cycling's Ride of the Year

2015 has been a vintage year for British cyclists, with a raft of trophies and medals to show for some incredible, heartstopping rides. It’s this display of talent and prowess that British Cycling seeks to celebrate with the Ride of the Year Award. 

The Ride of the Year Award has been been running annually since 2011, and this year’s shortlist is not short on momentous achievements. The World Championship-winning ride from Lizzie Armitstead, or para-cycling team Steve Bate and Adam Duggleby who collected their first gold medal after beating super time-trial rivals by over 10 seconds, are both prime examples. 

“The Ride of the Year is an opportunity to reflect and celebrate the achievements of the Great Britain Cycling Team over the past 12 months,”  a British Cycling spokesperson told BikeRadar. “These are sporting performances and moments which have inspired many in their cycling.” she added. 

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This year, the general public will cast the deciding votes, selecting one winner from a shortlist of 14 cyclists to take the accolade. “With so many fantastic moments to choose from, we wanted to open the award up the wider cycling community and allow them to decide who receives the award,” British Cycling said of its decision to run the voting in this way. 

The shortlist was drawn up by an expert panel, including Great Britain Cycling Team technical director Shane Sutton, British Cycling cycle sport and membership director Jonny Clay, Sky Sports cycling journalist Orla Chennaoui and British Cycling president Bob Howden. 

The winner will receive the cycle industry’s Golden Jubilee Trophy, which will be presented at the annual British Cycling Gala Dinner. 

Lizzie Armitstead

  • Discipline: Road
  • Nominated ride: World Championships in Richmond, Virginia 

Dame Sarah Storey

  • Discipline: Para-cycling road
  • Nominated ride: Para-cycling Road World Championships

Rachel Atherton

  • Discipline: Mountain bike
  • Nominated ride: World Championships 2015

Laurie Greenland

  • Discipline: Mountain bike
  • Nominated ride: UCI Downhill Mountain Bike World Championships

Liam Phillips

  • Discipline: BMX
  • Nominated ride: UCI BMX Supercross World Cup

Nikki Harris

  • Discipline: Cyclocross
  • Nominated ride: UEC European Cyclocross Championships

Vicky Brown

  • Discipline: Cycle Speedway
  • Nominated ride: Cycle Speedway World Championships

Bethany Shriever

  • Discipline: BMX
  • Nominated ride: UEC BMX European Cup

Gabriel Cullaigh

  • Discipline: Road
  • Nominated ride: Course de la Paix stage one

Tom Pidcock

  • Discipline: Cyclocross
  • Nominated ride: UEC European Cyclocross Championships

Laura Trott

  • Discipline: Track
  • Nominated ride: UCI Track Cycling World Cup Cali

Mark Stewart

  • Discipline: Track
  • Nominated ride: UCI Track Cycling World Cup Cambridge

Steve Bate & Adam Duggleby

  • Discipline: Para-cycling road
  • Nominated ride: UCI Para-cycling Road World Cup

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Northwave Fahrenheit Arctic 2 GTX boots

Northwave says that its GTXs offer the ultimate in winter protection, with thermal qualities to keep the chills out – down to a claimed –25°C – and materials to keep the dry in.

They are built upon Northwave’s NRG carbon-reinforced sole, which is suitably stiff with only the slightest discernible flex when stomping through a sprint out of the saddle. What surprised us about the sole was its mesh insert vent sections, when you’d expect a winter boot to be as well sealed as possible.

Related: The best winter bib tights for cycling

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But sandwiched between the upper’s outer and lining, and sitting between the insole and sole, is ‘Pique’, a sock-like membrane from Gore-Tex. The range-topping, water-resistant-yet-breathable material works very well.

Your feet stay warm when it’s chilly, but the breathability means you don’t get that boil-in-the-bag feeling that can be the case when you wear waterproof overshoes with standard road shoes. A lace covering flap, which also forms part of the adjustable neoprene cuff, helps to keep things in place and stop water getting in – especially from running off your legs into your shoes.

But the upper’s large mesh swathes do retain moisture when they get wet, and the windchill can be a little over-cooling, though it never gets uncomfortable. The microfibre lace and push-button retention system means you can get the fit right, but we found the laces too long, and so we ended up stuffing the excess wherever we could fit it.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Specialized Pitch

Specialized was one of the pioneers of production mountain bikes – the and vast experience of the ‘Big S’ seems to have gone some way to enriching its basic Pitch.

Pennywise performance

It might be ridiculously cheap, but Specialized’s designers have done a decent job with what little cash they’ve had to splash on this ride. The all-black stealth ‘murdered out’ look of frame and fork, plus distinctive curved top tube, definitely give the Pitch a businesslike rather than budget appeal.

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The pressed-steel chainrings are cheap – in every sense – bits of kit

There are rack and kickstand mounts too, although seat tube bottle bosses mean limited seat drop for coping with really steep descents. While they’re from the same SR Suntour XCT family as the forks on the Trek Marlin 6 we tested alongside the Pitch, the shorter legs needed to straddle a 27.5in rather than 29in wheel reduce the locking effect of braking and turning stress.

Related: Best mountain bikes under £500

Inevitable compromises

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

BikeRadar Bargains: Action camera deals

Bargain action cameras! That got your attention. Whether you’re in the market for a GoPro, Garmin Virb, Shimano Sport or Sony Action Cam, you’ll be happy to hear there are discounts to be found. You’ll be uploading the epic exploits you get up to this Christmas in no time. 

Action cameras like these come with a variety of attachments too, so you can attach one to your helmet, strap it to your chest or mount it on your handlebars – or if you splash out and buy a few, all of the above!

Garmin VIRB Action Camera £219.99 £115.49

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Related: Garmin VIRB Elite action camera review

There’s a pretty hefty saving on the Garmin VIRB – it’s nearly half price! One of the main benefits of the VIRB is the high definition screen so you can actually see what you’ve filmed straight away, without having to connect to other devices or a laptop only to find you filmed your thighs. You can also take still images with the VIRB, making it a film and stills camera in one. 

Available now with a 48 percent discount from Hargroves Cycles

Shimano Sport Camera CM-1000 £249.99 £179.99

Sony AZ1 Mini Action Camera With Live View Remote £279.99 £219.00

GoPro Hero+ LCD Action Camera £249.99 £199.00

GoPro Hero4 Session Action Camera £249.99 £159.00

Kitvision Splash 1080 Action Camera £99.99 £39.00

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

The MRP SXg could be the chain guide we’ve been waiting for

MRP has just released its latest chain guide. The SXg is designed as one guide to rule all disciplines – trail, enduro and downhill.

“I’m really proud of this product, which started as a concept I had over a year ago. The idea was to produce a guide that addressed every complaint I’d ever heard about chain guides. It’s silent (and actually makes your bike quieter than with no guide), light, durable and completely drag free,” said MRP’s Noah Sears.

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On paper at least, the SXg occupies an appealing middle ground between the burlier G4 and more minimalist AMg(V2). Unlike the G4, the SXg lacks a roller to tension the chain (which also creates drag). The AMg(v2) has a lower skid plate, but doesn’t provide lower chain retention. The SXg uses a lower skid plate that doubles as a passive lower chain guide.

The upper guide and lower guides are constructed from Nylon and co-molded with a soft TPU plastic strategically positioned to reduce chain noise

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

How to change your bike wheels for winter

Putting a tougher set of wheels on your bike for riding in winter will save your summer wheelset from the salt, grit and grime of the off-season months, helping to make your most expensive racing hoops last longer.

If you’re a beginner, and you’re thinking of changing your wheels for the first time, here’s how to do just that in five easy steps.

1. Remove your front wheel

Let’s get the easy one out of the way. To remove your front wheel, open the front brake caliper’s quick-release (QR) – usually situated just below where the cable enters the brake – then flip the wheel’s QR lever and unscrew the nut at the other end, until the wheel is loose enough to drop out.

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Most forks come with safety tabs to avoid accidental releases these days, so make sure the QR skewer can clear these or remove the lever entirely, taking care not to lose the two small springs that sandwich between the ends of the skewer and the hub.

For those with thru-axles, the job’s only marginally more difficult – simply flip the lever like you would for a ‘regular’ quick-release (see above), then rotate anti-clockwise until it comes loose from the fork.

Related: AnygryAsian: Bring on the thru-axles

2. Then remove the rear wheel

3. Transfer those tyres

4. Swap over your cassette

5. Fit the winter wheels

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

MET wants to glow up your head

Helmet manufacturer MET has unveiled a glow-in-the-dark version of its range-topping Sine Thesis road lid. Badged the Sine Thesis Nightlights, the £190 (international pricing TBC) helmet has been strategically injected with luminescent material and sports reflective highlights as well as an integrated USB rear light.

Various sections of the helmet, including its unique exoskeleton as well as its strap dividers and retention system adjuster, will glow for up to two hours in darkness. Yep, just like those little glow-in-the-dark toys you did or didn’t have as a kid, the material absorbs light during daytime and emits a gentle green glow at night.

The Sine Thesis features reflective stickers and logos at the front, the back and the sides of the helmet’s shell as well as its straps. Additionally, the Nightlights version of the Sine Thesis comes complete with MET’s Safe-T Advanced LED rear light. 

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Attaching to the retention dial at the back of the helmet, this six-LED USB-charged light is supposedly visible from 500m away and features flashing/constant modes. It’s available in white, black or yellow.

Would you go with the glow? Think it’s a dim development? Let us know in our poll below.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

The best UK winter Rides

Wild trails that are good to go any time of year

Definitely worth the early start (McCandlish)
Definitely worth the early start (McCandlish)

There are many great winter routes all over the UK – here’s our pick of the best
Source: MBR