Win a Trek Session 9.9 worth £7300

In issue 325 of Mountain Biking UK – out now – we’ve been looking at how the Trek Session has developed over the years to become the podium-raiding bike that it is today.

In the last part of our feature series, Evolution of a Classic, we speak to Brook Macdonald and Martin Whiteley and run a fine comb through all of the details of how the Trek has come to look the way it has. Check out the video above for more.

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We’re also giving you the chance to win your very own Trek Session 9.9 – click here to enter the competition.

For more, you can check out a free preview of Mountain Biking UK, available in most newsagents, the Apple Newsstand and Zinio.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

X-Fusion Sweep Roughcut HLR

X-Fusion has come almost from out of nowhere to dominate the mid-range fork market. That’s with good reason: the brand offers suspension performance that’s almost on a par with the top end offerings of the big hitters, without their hefty price tags.

The Sweep uses a 34mm chassis that’s been around for a while, except here it’s with a 46mm offset to suit the middle size wheelers. The sealed, high and low speed compression adjustable Roughcut damper is all new.

Related: X-Fusion Roughcut HLR damper design revealed

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This means that for committed tinkerers and tweakers it’s sublime, allowing a level of adjustment to suit you own riding style and the trail conditions that many more expensive forks struggle to match. The all-alloy adjusters add a quality feel to the fork and the compression detents (the clicks that separate each step of adjustment) are nice and sharp.

Build quality is solid and trail feel nicely nuanced

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Focus Cayo Al Sora

Engineered in Germany, Focus bikes have a reputation for offering high performance at good value prices – something the Cayo Al Sora pulls off. The frame and fork package on this entry-level bike is superb, but a few issues prevented it from coming out on top in our 2016 entry-level road bike shootout.

The 2016 Focus Cayo Al Sora

Aggressive, fast and fun

The Cayo is quite European in its approach, with lower and more aggressive geometry than many of its price-point peers. If your aspirations mostly relate to speed, the Cayo will reward in spades with its responsive handling and immediate power transfer.

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Related: Best entry-level road bikes: US/Aus / UK

Attack in a sprint or drop fast into a corner and you get a sense of true race inspiration. Despite its overall weight, an unavoidable result of the low price, it’s a bike that leaps forward with urgency.

Superb frame and fork quality marred by cable rattle

Conclusion: a bike for the racer race fan

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

4iiii Precision Pro power meters now in the WorldTour

The power meter market isn’t slowing down. A new player, Canadian brand 4iiii, is perhaps best known for its US$399 left-side power meter. Now sitting on the Specialized bikes of Etixx Quick-Step, the latest from 4iiii is looking rather polished.

As used by the team, the 4iiii Precision Pro power meter is a new left-and-right measuring device that offers ANT+ and Bluetooth connectivity. Although there’s no word on availability, this model could be the lightest option yet, claiming just a 25g addition to the crankset.

While 4iiii may be relatively new, company president and CEO Kip Fyfe, is no stranger to bike tech. Fyfe co-founded Dynastream Innovations, which produced the ANT+ protocol, and was sold to Garmin in 2006.   

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The left-side power meter is already available

The brand is already selling left-only versions of the Precision power meter. Weighing just 9 grams, the left crank-arm based device is an extremely similar concept to that introduced by Stages Cycling.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

The five key areas of training for road cyclists

By paying special attention to these five areas of cycling training, you’ll be able to cope with most things no matter what your level of ability. Give the routines a read through, then adjust your own training to make sure you cover each discipline.

You’ll definitely need to find out your maximum heart rate for some of the exercises. To do this, climb a long, steady hill seated, upping the pace every five minutes. When you can go no faster, stand up and sprint for 15 seconds. Stop and take your heart rate.

These five cornerstones of training will set you up to make the most of your cycling, as long as you pay good attention to each specialty.

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Related: How to get more speed with less training

1. Hill training

It’s all about power – you need more of it in your legs to fly up those inclines comfortably without leaving all your energy behind. Gym sessions that strengthen your leg and back muscles undoubtedly help, but you don’t want to put on too much bulk as this will ultimately slow you down on your bike. 

Beginner workout

Advanced workout

2. Endurance training

Beginner workout

Advanced workout

3. Recovery training

Beginner workout

Advanced workout

4. Threshold training

Beginner workout

Advanced workout

5. Interval training

Beginner workout

Advanced workout

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Cycling could save you money on your car insurance

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A specialist insurance company is now offering cyclists a discount on their car insurance. Carinsurance4cyclists.com has deemed roadies a safer bet than other regular car drivers – something that it says translates to discounts in premiums offered by the firm.

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The logic behind the discount tracks back to findings from a report conducted by a specialist motorcycle insurance broker. After analysing several years’ worth of data, the firm found a positive connection between the driving of those who both rode a motorcycle and drove a car.

So, how do you prove that you’re a cyclist? Carinsurance4cyclists.com simply specifies that riders will have to be part of a cycling club. Because of the individual nature of insurance premiums it’s impossible to specify exact savings on offer to drivers, but anyone who’s curious can request a free quote via this page on the firm’s website.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Pace RC127

When you’re one of the most iconic, pioneering mountain bike brands releasing your first new bike in a while it’s a big deal. Especially when you’re releasing it into a mountain bike gene pool that’s recently been changing its DNA faster and more radically than at any other time in the MTB timeline.

In fact we’ve actually featured previous ‘final prototype’ versions of this bike before, but now fastidious Pace designer and ferociously fast rider Adrian Carter promises us this is definitely the full production version of the long awaited RC127.

Still steel

One thing that Carter has stuck with throughout the RC127 design process is tough, taut but still forgiving Reynolds 853 steel alloy. It’s long enough to be short stem-friendly now though, with a 67-degree head angle and low chainguide-tabbed bottom bracket.

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Related: Pace RC127 prototype

The skinny tapered head tube uses external bearing cups but the 38mm down tube and 35mm top tube and seat tube are a bigger diameter than normal with a throat gusset and further reinforcement on the chainstays, so they can splay wide enough to accommodate 2.4in treads.

Rock solid

Bearable backend

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar