How to lose belly fat by cycling

It’s easy to build up unwanted fat on the waistline, but cycling can help you lose belly fat and get back into shape – here are a few tips to help you get leaner on the bike.

Keep a steady pace

Although your stomach muscles aren’t working as hard as your quads or glutes when you’re cycling, cycling’s aerobic nature means you are burning fat. Work at a moderately intensive pace, so that conversation is possible, but not easy – less than than 80 percent of your maximum heart rate – three times a week for about two hours. 

This kind of lower-intensity training burns a greater percentage of fat than high intensities, but bear in mind overall calorie burning would be less than higher-intensity sessions for the same duration, so don’t go overboard with the post-ride snacks.

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

Related: How to lose weight cycling

Try interval training

To really push the calorie burn, add in some interval training. At the end of your long ride, or if you only have a short amount of time to train, do six sets of all-out efforts, each lasting two minutes, with 30 seconds of rest in between. As you improve you can keep going for longer. 

Be sure to stay aware of traffic if you’re doing flat-out efforts on the road – consider making the most of your turbo trainer for these sessions.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Scott Genius 700 Tuned Plus

We expected to see plenty of 650b+ bikes launched for 2016, but it seems Scott is one of the few companies to really be pushing the new wheel/tyre size. We took the Swiss firm’s top-flight Genius 700 Tuned Plus into the hills to see just what the pluses really are.

Tweaked 29er frame, custom shock and serious kit

The Genius Plus bikes use the same carbon front triangle as Scott’s high-end Genius 29ers. Here though, offset headset cups are in place to slacken the head angle to 67.3 degrees (in the low setting).

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

The Kashima-coated Fox 34 fork features the latest FIT4 damper

The new alloy rear end has the latest 148mm Boost axle spacing and clearance for 3in rubber, but Scott has kept the chainstays in check at 445mm. Other key measurements on the medium bike include a 600mm effective top tube, 425mm reach and 73.9-degree seat angle.

Related: Exploring 27.5+

Feeling the pressure

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Pinball from berm to berm with this crafty technique

Ever notice how many of the fastest riders out there seem to just ping from berm to berm? Well, it’s not quite the black magic it may seem – instead, it’s the result of great technique and plenty of practice.

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

One rider who displays exemplary technique with this move is Sam Fowler of Bristol-based skills coaching firm Pedal Progression. Watch the video above as Sam breaks down the moves required so that you too can can up your berm game.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Endura gets winter wrapped up with new women's mountain bike kit

Endura’s women’s mountain bike kit range holds a selection of products designed to keep out the rain and mud, keep in the warmth, and allow you to focus on riding all winter through. 

‘There’s no such thing as bad weather’, or so goes the saying. It’s all about having the right winter clothing for mountain biking – and Endura has a range of women’s specific bike kit designed for just that. The range encompasses shorts, waterproof jackets, base layers and accessories; here we take a first look at a selection of products on offer, which have arrived at BikeRadar‘s Bristol HQ. Australian availability is limited, with prices TBC, though many UK and US retailers will ship internationally.

Related: 50 ways to be a better mountain biker this winter

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

Singletrack jacket

The women’s Singletrack Jacket (£99 / $169.99) is a full seam-sealed breathable waterproof jacket. The jacket features a hood that can be rolled away when not in use with toggles for adjusting the fit. 

The fit of the cuffs is adjustable with Velcro pull tabs, and the hem can also be tightened to fit with the pull cord. For those of us who end up riding in wet but warm conditions, the underarm pit vents are likely to be a handy feature

Transrib women’s base layer

Wms Singletrack II 3/4

Wms Baabaa gift pack – cap, socks and neck warmer

Women’s Strike gloves

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Specialized 2FO ClipLite shoes

The 2FO ClipLites are Specialized’s ‘hybrid’ trail riding/enduro racing shoes, designed to balance cross-country style pedalling efficiency with the flexible, feedbackrich feel needed for downhill riding.

Just like on Spesh’s top-tier XC footwear, twin indexed Boa dials and a single Velcro strap keep them secure, with almost perfect tension across the top of the foot. Because the S2-Snap dials don’t feature the ‘pop up to loosen off’ mechanism of some Boa designs (which does slow the removal process a little, because they need to be unwound), there’s no chance of accidently knocking one and it loosening off on the trail.

Specialized caters to trail riders with 2FO ClipLite shoe

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

The sturdy upper gets additional padding on the inside of the ankle to help with those all-too-frequent (and annoyingly painful) knocks, while there’s enough additional rubber around the toe box to ward off some pretty hefty rock strikes.

When it comes to the sole, many similarities can be drawn with Specialized’s more gravity-orientated 2FO Clipless shoes. Lengthy cleat slots make it easy to achieve a downhill-like rearward cleat position, and the slotted, low-profile tread around the cleat pocket ensures clipping in is interference free and extremely easy, even on bigger platform-style clipless pedals with pins. At the toe and around the heel, Specialized has added a bit more depth to the tread and used its ‘SlipNot’ rubber compound for better off-the-bike purchase. This also helps should you sit your foot on the pedal without clipping in.

The ClipLites have a relatively snug fit and those with particularly wide feet should definitely try a pair on before buying. They’re pretty stiff, but do offer a bit more give than similar ‘hybrid’ shoes such as Five Ten’s Kestrels.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Dolan Preffisio 105

Bikes like the Dolan Preffisio are the bread and butter of the UK winter cycling scene. Under the Dolan name or others, you’ll be familiar with the formula: a stout alloy frame with long and low traditional geometry; full mudguards bolted securely in place; and standard rim brakes.

A reassuringly gimmick-free ride

Dolan lets you spec the Preffisio however you want it, and builds start at an incredible £612.99 for a Shimano Sora-equipped bike. We requested what we think is likely to be one of the most popular options – full 11-speed 105 with 25mm tyres and mudguards, the latter costing an additional £19.99 if you don’t want to fit them yourself. Shimano 105 feels like the sweet spot in the Japanese giant’s groupset range for utility – it shares features with its shinier siblings Ultegra and Dura-Ace, but consumables like chains and cassettes are vastly more affordable, and the finish is low-key enough that you won’t feel too guilty for marring it.

Related: The best winter bib tights for cycling

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

In this day and age, 25mm tyres should be a given – in fact, we’d be tempted to go bigger were if not for the fact that the Preffisio’s standard brake calipers will make things very tight if you try, at least with mudguards fitted. And speaking of mudguards, the Flinger units Dolan supplies are the real deal, offering full coverage and better yet, mudflaps both front and rear. Your club-mates will revel in the lack of spray, as will your feet.

Builds start at a little over £600 for a Claris-equipped bike, but we reckon the the 105 model is the sweet spot

Dolan out the pain

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Most anticipated road bike products of 2016

Will disc brakes chop everyone’s heads off? How does the Cannonade Slate feel under your derriere? When, oh when, does SRAM’s new wireless eTap groupset get here?

These are just a few of the things we’re most looking forward to seeing in 2016 – check out our full list above, and let us know what you’re most looking forward to in the comments below.

ADVERTISEMENT
advertisement

Oh, and don’t fret trail heads – we also have a list of the MTB products we’re most looking forward to in 2016.

So what are you most looking forward to? Let us know below!

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar