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Urban Cyclist is for riders who appreciate style over speed and who ride for the sheer joy of it. This is cycling as an indulgence not a sport; it’s about smiling rather than sweating. Every issue is packed with features on the most fascinating aspects of cycling culture from around the world, interviews with artisan frame builders and truly beautiful photography. We have tests of deeply desirable bikes and gear for all tastes and wallets, and we review everything with absolute honesty.

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TERMS & CONDITIONS: The gifted offer is for new UK subscribers to the print edition paying by direct debit only. You will receive four issues per year. Your subscription will start with the next available issue. The 35 percent discount is based on buying six issues at UK shop price. Offer ends 24/03/16.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Fizik Aliante 00 saddle

Right, let’s get one question out of the way first. Can any saddle be worth this much money? Without wanting to fence-sit too badly, the answer is: it depends.

The 00 features the same lightweight carbon hull as the Aliante R1, which was the first major overhaul of the Fizik range since its debut in 1999. This has been stiffened where it needs to be while being flexible enough to offer ample comfort. The 00, however, also gets a new variation of the single-piece Mobius rail found on Fizik’s Kurve models. Fizik has lightened the rail for the 00 and, as you’d expect for the price, it’s made from carbon – in one continuous piece.

Related: Fizik Aliante R1 review

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The Mobius design anchors at the nose, and here it’s bonded rather than bolted. The flattened plate under the nose seamlessly blends into the squared-off oversized 7x9mm rail – which means you’ll need to make sure it’s compatible with your seatpost clamp. While the Kurve’s Mobius rail features a bridge across the rails, Fizik has refined the design for the 00, losing the bridge to save a few grams.

This transition isn’t just a styling feature. The new one-piece rail also makes the most of carbon’s natural spring, resulting in one of the most comfortable lightweight saddles we’ve ever tested. The 00’s microtex upper weighs very little and attaches to a double-shelled top. Two layers of stiff, lightweight carbon sandwich a layer of high-density padding, a neat manufacturing technique that results in smooth, clean lines on the saddle’s underside as well as on top.

Familiar form

The shape at first appears as familiar as any of the many Aliantes we’ve used over the years. The distinctive swoopy profile holds you in place perfectly, with the combination of flex in the hull’s wings and the high-quality padding making it a supremely comfortable saddle.

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Saracen Tufftrax Comp Disc

Saracen has been a consistent high achiever when it comes to delivering affordable rides that feel like proper mountain bikes – and here the firm has pulled off the impressive feat of doing so for well under £500.

Wheel versatility

The alloy frame is shared with other, even cheaper Tufftrax models. But you still get hydroformed main tube shaping and S-curved rear stays, top tube control lines to keep them out of harm’s way and bolted Crud Catcher under the down tube to stop mud spraying in your face.

Related: The best mountain bikes under £500

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While the seat clamp is bolted rather than quick-release, the forward-facing slot stops rear-wheel spray seeping into the frame and it can be dropped right down for steep descents. Saracen runs overlapping 27.5in (13-19in) and 29in (15-21in) wheel-sized versions of the Comp, in case you prefer a smoother, hybrid tyre-compatible big wheel Tufftrax.

The frame is hydroformed alloy, with a 69-degree head angle

Basically fun

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Nine cycling books to put on your 2015 wishlist

So that was 2015. Where did it all go? Well, our list of the best cycling books of 2015 is a good place to start. We’ve included autobiographies from some of the biggest names in the peloton, through tales of bonkers record attempts to an affectionate portrayal of the distinctly British hill-climb scene.

The below selections are by no means exhaustive – and please let us know of any good ones we’ve missed in the comments – but we think this will be a good place to start if you’re still hoping (or looking) for a cheeky stocking filler.

1. My Hour – Bradley Wiggins

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We begin our list with a new book from one of the biggest names in pro cycling. Sir Wiggins has had a busy year, what with forming his own eponymous team, contesting Paris-Roubaix and winning gold at the European track championships. But arguably his greatest feat of 2015 was setting the new benchmark for the Hour Record at London’s Lee Valley VeloPark, of 54.526km.

This book is his account of the planning and preparation, training and execution of what is described as one of the toughest challenges in sport, with its own unique pain cave. Eddy Merckx called it the hardest thing he ever did, and in My Hour the British cycling champ charts his own journey through it – with some excellent photography throughout.

Buy My Hour

2. The Biography of the Modern Bike – Chris Boardman

3. The Racer – David Millar

4. The Year: Reawakening the Legend of Cycling’s Hardest Endurance Record – Dave Barter

5. The World of Cycling According to G – Geraint Thomas

6. A Corinthian Endeavour – Paul Jones

7. The Yellow Jersey Club – Edward Pickering

8. Bernard Hinault and the Fall and Rise of French Cycling – William Fotherington

9. Alpe d’Huez: The Story of Pro Cycling’s Greatest Climb – Peter Cossins

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

The 10 best iPhone and Android apps for cyclists

With the iPhone now onto its ninth incarnation and outstanding new Android smartphones launching at every price point, there are more cycling apps than ever – ranging from highly analytical training tools to simpler social apps and useful navigational resources.

For some – Google Maps, for instance – you’ll need to have your device on the handlebars to take full advantage. For others, like Strava, you can just press Start, put your phone in your jersey pocket, and go.

With Bluetooth accessories such as heart-rate monitors, speed sensors and even power meters becoming more common, you can get your smartphone’s BT connection and processor to do the work that used to require a separate computer and, not so long ago, wires. In fact, some phones (such as Samsung’s Galaxy S6) support ANT+, too, which means most modern bike gadgets will talk to it.

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Here are our picks of the five best iPhone and Android apps for riding (updated November 2015 from our original picks in 2012). Some are totally free, some cost up front and some of them allow you to unlock more bells and whistles for a fee. Fair warning: Any GPS-based app will tax your phone’s battery, so these are generally better suited to shorter rides. 

Video: best Android and iPhone apps for cycling

Wahoo Fitness

Cyclemeter

Google Maps

Map My Ride

Strava

Viewranger

First Aid by British Red Cross

GoPro

Bike Doctor

Weather Pro

Dirt School

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

Tifosi CK3 Giro Claris

Tifosi’s CK3 Giro Claris is being marketed as a first race bike, or a sporty bike for riding purely for pleasure. It’s been completely overhauled for 2016.

Affordable alloy artistry

The British-designed Tifosi’s revision makes full use of aluminium’s ability to be manipulated even at this modest price. And while our test model featured Shimano’s Claris, the CK3 is also available in Sora, 105 and Campagnolo Veloce builds.

Traditional tubing has been ditched in favour of a huge D-shaped down tube, and the head tube has been revamped to a tapered design for greater stiffness and better handling. The top tube is large and ovalised where it meets the head tube, flattening and slimming dramatically before joining the seat tube.

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Not long ago, carbon forks were a rare sight on bikes at this price

The oversized chainstays are designed to provide a direct feel through the pedals, though their profile did mean an occasional heel-clip when pedalling hard and leaning into a corner.

Firm but fair

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar

It's time to cast your votes for British Cycling's Ride of the Year

2015 has been a vintage year for British cyclists, with a raft of trophies and medals to show for some incredible, heartstopping rides. It’s this display of talent and prowess that British Cycling seeks to celebrate with the Ride of the Year Award. 

The Ride of the Year Award has been been running annually since 2011, and this year’s shortlist is not short on momentous achievements. The World Championship-winning ride from Lizzie Armitstead, or para-cycling team Steve Bate and Adam Duggleby who collected their first gold medal after beating super time-trial rivals by over 10 seconds, are both prime examples. 

“The Ride of the Year is an opportunity to reflect and celebrate the achievements of the Great Britain Cycling Team over the past 12 months,”  a British Cycling spokesperson told BikeRadar. “These are sporting performances and moments which have inspired many in their cycling.” she added. 

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This year, the general public will cast the deciding votes, selecting one winner from a shortlist of 14 cyclists to take the accolade. “With so many fantastic moments to choose from, we wanted to open the award up the wider cycling community and allow them to decide who receives the award,” British Cycling said of its decision to run the voting in this way. 

The shortlist was drawn up by an expert panel, including Great Britain Cycling Team technical director Shane Sutton, British Cycling cycle sport and membership director Jonny Clay, Sky Sports cycling journalist Orla Chennaoui and British Cycling president Bob Howden. 

The winner will receive the cycle industry’s Golden Jubilee Trophy, which will be presented at the annual British Cycling Gala Dinner. 

Lizzie Armitstead

  • Discipline: Road
  • Nominated ride: World Championships in Richmond, Virginia 

Dame Sarah Storey

  • Discipline: Para-cycling road
  • Nominated ride: Para-cycling Road World Championships

Rachel Atherton

  • Discipline: Mountain bike
  • Nominated ride: World Championships 2015

Laurie Greenland

  • Discipline: Mountain bike
  • Nominated ride: UCI Downhill Mountain Bike World Championships

Liam Phillips

  • Discipline: BMX
  • Nominated ride: UCI BMX Supercross World Cup

Nikki Harris

  • Discipline: Cyclocross
  • Nominated ride: UEC European Cyclocross Championships

Vicky Brown

  • Discipline: Cycle Speedway
  • Nominated ride: Cycle Speedway World Championships

Bethany Shriever

  • Discipline: BMX
  • Nominated ride: UEC BMX European Cup

Gabriel Cullaigh

  • Discipline: Road
  • Nominated ride: Course de la Paix stage one

Tom Pidcock

  • Discipline: Cyclocross
  • Nominated ride: UEC European Cyclocross Championships

Laura Trott

  • Discipline: Track
  • Nominated ride: UCI Track Cycling World Cup Cali

Mark Stewart

  • Discipline: Track
  • Nominated ride: UCI Track Cycling World Cup Cambridge

Steve Bate & Adam Duggleby

  • Discipline: Para-cycling road
  • Nominated ride: UCI Para-cycling Road World Cup

You can read more at BikeRadar.com


Source: Bike Radar